Delegation

While I am gone on this exercise, I had to appoint someone to fill my role in a contract. I had conflicting commitments/contracts and one had to become subordinate to the other. It was a negotiated agreement up front so there were no issues. When you delegate to someone, you are typically delegating the decision-making authority but you remain responsible for the decisions. They have the authority but I have the responsibility. There are a number of benefits to using delegation as a professional development tool – it allows the leader to do more and, it increases the morale, confidence and productivity of subordinates. Having been the recipient of delegated tasks, I can attest to the growth that I experienced because someone delegated to me. It is important for the leader to pick people who are ready for the added work – set them up for success. Leaders need to give them the freedom to complete the job but follow-up enough to keep the task on target, have a clear set of goals and be consistent in your oversight and, never delegate projects that YOU are absolutely supposed to do. When a delegated task is completed, take the time to review the project with them to see how they felt it went, what they learned and what they might do differently but most importantly, praise them for their work.

“Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and earth has been given to me.” Matthew 28:18

This verse makes me wonder what the disciples thought when they heard this. They knew that Jesus was special but to hear Him declare His authority must have been powerful. The difference between this declaration and delegation is that God did not delegate His decision-making (power) to Jesus – He was in Him. The Lutheran Church teaches “With the universal Christian Church, The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod teaches and responds to the love of the Triune God: the Father, creator of all that exists; Jesus Christ, the Son, who became human to suffer and die for the sins of all human beings and to rise to life again in the ultimate victory over death and Satan; and the Holy Spirit, who creates faith through God’s Word and Sacraments. The three persons of the Trinity are coequal and coeternal, one God.” (lcms.org) There is no delegation here. Jesus needed to tell the disciples that He had the authority. It wasn’t until after His death that they began to understand the meaning of what He was saying. In a retrospect, they took the time understand what they learned and did it with Jesus in the days before His ascension.

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